Rocky Point

Rocky Point on Trailforks.com

The NWTA Rocky Point Recreation Area is a leased property owned by the Weyerhaeuser Company (a private timber company). The area is approximately 3,000 acres, has multiple points of access, and currently has a mixture of gravel roads and trails optimized for off-road cycling, but also open to walking. NWTA members in good standing have access to the area, and NWTA is actively engaged with Weyerhaeuser to develop the existing trail network into a more comprehensive system of interconnected trails. Over the coming years, we plan to expand the inventory of XC and DH trails in the area. A map of the boundary of the Rocky Point property can be seen at the bottom of this page.

If you are an NWTA member, this is your new local area to access nature on a bike. Go enjoy it. You can ride it twelve months of the year.

Access

SOME SOUTH SIDE FIREORADS CLOSED UNTIL LATE AUGUST

Active forestry operations will be in effect Monday to Friday ALL HOURS, from June 4th until August 21st. Limit travel on gravel roads at Rocky Point on the Southside,  yield to trucks always, adhere to posted closures, and be careful at trail/road crossings. (see map below)

Under no circumstances should bikers access the area South of Pipeline Crossing during this closure. Please adhere to all closure notices posted on site.

Specifics: Restricted travel beyond the blue gate. Bikers should proceed from the parking lot to the entrance of Tres Amigos with a keen awareness of potential truck traffic. Bikers should only access South trails by climbing up Tres Amigos and using the Pipeline crossing to get to Switchblade and DH trails. Always listen for trucks approaching. Cross the roads with caution, and always yield.

  1. Minimize exposure. Only crossroads at trail intersections
  2. Stop, look, and listen. Come to a complete stop before crossing – verify there are no trucks.
  3. Get out of the way. If a truck is heading toward you immediately dismount your bike and get off the road.
  4. Stay out of blind spots. Work to maintain eye contact with truck drivers to communicate if necessary.
  5. Obey signs. This is an active logging area. Access to certain trails, roads, and parking areas can change weekly, daily, and even hourly. Stop and read signs to ensure access or parking allowed. Trucks need extra turning space. If you are parked in a way that blocks access to a road or gate they need to use, they will not hesitate to have your vehicle towed.

NWTA holds the lease effective August 1, 2019. Access to the leased property is available to NWTA members provided the following criteria are met:

  1. NWTA membership is current, and member is in good standing https://nw-trail.org/join/
  2. Member has read the terms and conditions found at http://www.nw-trail.org/rocky-terms
  3. Member has signed the online release of liability waiver found at http://www.nw-trail.org/rockywaiver
  4. Member has checked the up to date access status to the property at http://www.nw-trail.org/rocky-terms
  5. Get an ID band for your bike. You will be able to pick these up at NWTA member meetings, Fat Tire Farm, Cyclepath, Bike Gallery, and Showers Pass (call to check availability).

Adults may sign a waiver to give access to a minor at the link listed above, but must also sign one for themselves, and the minor must be accompanied by the adult when accessing the property.

Parking details

Trailforks access to Rocky Point hidden trails

Weyerhaeuser agreement details

History

The trails out at Rocky Point are said to have originated as horse and moto trails. People have been riding bikes out at Rocky Point at least since the 1970s. It started on touring bikes mostly on gravel roads, but with a bit of venturing in on the singletrack. With the advent of mountain bikes in the 80s, folks started to make a more concerted effort to make the trails functional for bikes. Trail construction started ramping up in the mid-2000s spearheaded to a significant extent by Ron Strasser and John Joy who had obtained “semi-permission” from the landowner at the time (Longview Timberland) to build. Strasser focused on the south side while Joy focused on the north. Other, unnamed builders were also significant in building up the original trails including the more gnarly trails on the South Side. The buildup of large rouge wooden features soured the relationship with the timber company and lead to a more tenuous relationship and added restrictions for use and building. The land was sold in 2016 to Weyerhaeuser. At their other properties, Weyerhaeuser manages a system of recreational permits mostly aimed at hunting and therefore implemented a similar system at Rocky Point. Unfortunately, what works well for hunters (very limited number of permits), doesn’t work well for mountain bike users. This effectively shut down access to most mountain bikers for several years. In 2019, and just off the success of the Klootchy Creek agreement, NWTA and Weyerhaeuser were able to come together to develop an agreement.  That agreement would remove the number limit on mountain bikers as long as NWTA managed access through its membership. Since then the trail system has been transformed with thousands of hours of trail building an maintenance in just the first six months of stewardship.

Upcoming plans

A professional trail builder is helping us develop a master plan for the region. Expect plans by early summer for 50 miles of single track!

Suggested loop

North Side Loop

  1. Start at the mid gate parking lot
  2. cross the road to RP United
  3. Left onto the fire road
  4. Left onto Playground/Triple bypass
  5. right onto Playground loop
  6. back onto the first fireroad and head left
  7. left onto Nettle Alley
  8. Right on the main fireroad
  9. Left on The Strasser
  10. Right to hop back on the fireroad and head back toward the parking lot
  11. Left on Friday the 13th
  12. Continue on Missing Link
  13. Continue on The Strasser
  14. Main road back to RP United
  15. RP United out

Contact

Scooter Sutterer – [email protected]

Rocky Point Events

Rocky Point News